Category: NSFW

archaeologicalnews:

Archaeologists have found in an ancient Pompeii bedroom a fresco depicting a sensual scene of a goddess and swan.

The figure of goddess Leda being impregnated by a swan representing Roman god Jupiter was a fairly common theme in home decoration in Pompeii and nearby Herculaneum, another ancient town destroyed in A.D. 79 by the volcanic eruption of Mount Vesuvius near present-day Naples.

But Pompeii archaeological park director Massimo Osanna praised this fresco as exceptional since the goddess appears to look at whoever’s looking at the fresco upon entering the bedroom.

“Leda watches the spectator with a sensuality that’s absolutely pronounced,” Osanna told the Italian news agency ANSA. Read more.

caballerodelatristefigura:

Attic Red Figure Mixing Bowl (column krater)

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (22.677)

Side A: Dionysos and satyr
Side B: Satyr and maenad

centuriespast:

Relief with Herakles and Omphale (or a nymph?)
Roman
Imperial Period
Mid–late 1st century A.D.

mfa

caballerodelatristefigura:

Drinking Cup (kylix) with Dionysos and a Satyr
Painted by Makron, ca. 490–480 BCE (Late Archaic Period)

Caskey-Beazley, Attic Vase Paintings (MFA), no. 139
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (13.67)

Interior, surrounded by a circle decorated with a meander: Dionysos holding a kantharos and a vine, and a satyr pouring from an oinochoë. At the left the inscription “The boy is handsome” (HO PAIS KALOS).

spills-roses:

George Barbier’s illustrations for Les chansons de Bilitis by Pierre Loüys

Do people make dildo of carthage jokes to you often? I'm genuinely curious

Probably about once a month (and I’ve had this blog for five years, I think?). Almost always on anon–cowards! If you’re making fun of my url, I should be able to make fun of yours! 

Yeah, I can see why you wouldn’t want to Google that…  We actually talked about this in one of my seminars when we were reading Plato’s Symposium (which is a discourse on the nature of love, eros) and discussing Greek paederestic relationships. And I did a lot of reading about Greek art a couple years ago, so I suppose I should try to answer. 

Don’t read past this point if you want to avoid NSFW words/pictures. 

In one of my classes, we looked at some depictions of erates/eromenos (lover/beloved) relationships on Athenian vases (which often have erotic scenes), and this topic came up. If I remember correctly, ancient sculptures have small genitalia because the Greeks (primarily talking about the Athenians here) preferred small phalluses. The Greeks associated large genitalia with wildness (promiscuity, lack of self-control, etc.) and barbarism. If you look at depictions of satyrs and barbarians in Greek art, they often have large phalluses. Comic characters do as well. In comedies (”satyr plays”–>”satire”), the actors would wear oversize phalluses as part of their costumes for comic effect. 

Here’s an example of a satyr playing an aulos (double flute) on Attic kantharos, which was probably used in the context of a symposium (a drinking party, from the Greek word meaning “drinking together”): 

image

And here is a typical symposium scene from an Attic bell-krater: 

image

This scene of symposiasts (attendees at a symposium) probably includes pairs of lovers because of the way that they are positioned together on the couches, with bearded men (traditionally the erastes was older) talking to beardless youths (traditionally the eromenos was younger). In certain periods of Greek society, especially the Archaic Period if I remember correctly, the erastes/eromenos relationship was depicted as the ideal relationship. This is discussed in the Symposium and also by some really creepy 6th-century poets whose names I don’t remember right now. 

There are a lot of vase paintings that show erotic scenes between the erates and eromenos or courtship scenes with the erastes giving his perspective eromenos gifts. I’m not going to going looking for those, but if you did, you would see the difference between the satyr’s phallus from the kantharos above and the genitalia of the “civilized” lovers. 

Please don’t send me any more asks about phalluses unless you’re correcting something I said. I wrote this all from memory (since I don’t want to look it up myself), so I may have gotten some things wrong. And I don’t actually want to know/remember all of this, but this question just dredged up all the info about this topic in my head. 

Moïse Kisling (Polish/French, 1891-1953), Nu Allongé, 1939. Oil on canvas.

José Clemente Orozco (1883-1949), Nude, 1910. Oil on paper.

themodernartists:

Andrea Mary Marshall (b. 1982), February (Calendar Girl #1), 2015. C-print.