Category: history

Italian fashion c. 1300, across all levels o…

Italian fashion c. 1300, across all levels of society. Albert Kretschmer (1825–1891) was a German painter and costume designer. This image comes from his book, Costumes of All Nations (1882). ©Wikimedia Commons.

Learn more about Florentine Sumputary Laws here: Issue 124 – Medieval Fashion

Riding Coat, first half 13th century. In add…

Riding Coat, first half 13th century. In addition to gold jewelry, affluent people during the Seljuq period and slightly later wore sumptuous silk robes. This coat is identified as a riding coat because of its cut, featuring a flare at the hip. Silk; weft-faced compound twill (samite) ©MET

Read more about Scandalous Frankish Fashions in our medieval fashion issue: Issue 124 – Medieval Fashion

Issue 124, Medieval Fashion

Issue 124, Medieval Fashion:

Fashion!
Turn to the left
Fashion!
Turn to the right
Oooh, fashion!
We are the goon squad and we’re coming to town
Beep-beep Beep-beep

The Medieval Magazine

The Medieval Magazine:

Wooo new FB page for us! Follow The Medieval Magazine on Facebook for updates, news and special sales! 😀

Michael Carini | LEARN MORE

Michael Carini | LEARN MORE

In August 2012, at the age of 28, I was reconnected with the biological family I never knew. At that time, I learned that my father, also named Michael, did not die in a car accident as I had always been told. Rather, I came to find out that he took his own life on my mother’s 21st Birthday, just shortly before I turned a year old. He did not leave a note. Almost 30 years later, in my most personal and emotional creation to date, I wrote that note for my father. Written through our collective heart, eyes, and hand, that piece of our soul is “Michael’s Note.”

Dedicated to the father I never had the honor and privilege to know-

Though I have publicly exhibited “Michael’s Note,” I don’t believe I have ever transcribed and posted its content. In honor of Mental Health Awareness Month, I would like to share that with you for the first time because I know it can be difficult to read from the painting images. Please note that this was written as a process of stream of consciousness and in one continuous sitting. To maintain authenticity and the necessary energy, I wrote it at a very low point when I was considering giving up. When I had previously considered giving up, I don’t believe I had ever intended to leave a note either. This experience allowed me to write the note my father never left and give his family a bit of peace, as I chose to give them the painting. At the same time, it was as if I was writing my own suicide note. This painting, in a sense, represented the death of a piece of myself so I could be reborn.

See and read “Michael’s Note” here: Michael’s Note

Michael Carini | LEARN MORE

Michael Carini | LEARN MORE

“The Up-Side of Down” was inspired by a 2009 assault and battery that hospitalized me with multiple facial fractures, severe eye trauma, and a concussion. My signature icon, which I saw flashing in my head during the concussive state, is a key repeating element in this series that represents life growing from death and discovering the positives in negatives.

“Midnight Dancer (Take Me Away)” was the very first painting I ever created for Deanne Hastings, my best friend and the person I loved most in the world. She used to call me her “Wings” and is the reason I have them tattooed on my back. Tragically, Deanne went missing in 2015 and has yet to be found. I still think about her every single day and a number of the paintings she inspired were sent to her family for her children to have one day.

This is one of the most valuable pieces I have in my studio. It is the two final postcards of the show I dedicated to her in 2010. If you take a close look, you can read the statement from the show. I came across these in my car long after she disappeared. I was also blessed to come across her handprints on my “10 Year Floor Canvas,” which also now hang in studio so she can continue to be with me as she continues to inspire me and my work. I hope I’m making her proud. I wouldn’t be the man I am today if it wasn’t for her. I love how this photo picks up the reflection of the window likes it’s a window between here and heaven, allowing us to see each other again for just a moment.

See more at CariniArts.com

Michael Carini | LEARN MORE

Michael Carini | LEARN MORE

“The Up-Side of Down” was inspired by a 2009 assault and battery that hospitalized me with multiple facial fractures, severe eye trauma, and a concussion. My signature icon, which I saw flashing in my head during the concussive state, is a key repeating element in this series that represents life growing from death and discovering the positives in negatives.

“Midnight Dancer (Take Me Away)” was the very first painting I ever created for Deanne Hastings, my best friend and the person I loved most in the world. She used to call me her “Wings” and is the reason I have them tattooed on my back. Tragically, Deanne went missing in 2015 and has yet to be found. I still think about her every single day and a number of the paintings she inspired were sent to her family for her children to have one day.

This is one of the most valuable pieces I have in my studio. It is the two final postcards of the show I dedicated to her in 2010. If you take a close look, you can read the statement from the show. I came across these in my car long after she disappeared. I was also blessed to come across her handprints on my “10 Year Floor Canvas,” which also now hang in studio so she can continue to be with me as she continues to inspire me and my work. I hope I’m making her proud. I wouldn’t be the man I am today if it wasn’t for her. I love how this photo picks up the reflection of the window likes it’s a window between here and heaven, allowing us to see each other again for just a moment.

See more at CariniArts.com

Michael Carini | LEARN MORE

Michael Carini | LEARN MORE

The artist journal and the messages from it were started around 2011 when I was on the precipice of homelessness. I didn’t have the resources the paint, so painting the words in the journal satiated that desire just enough until I could get back on my feet again. I realized there are lots of other people struggling out there and perhaps they could use some hope and encouragement from someone that has been in their shoes. We all need a little boost sometimes and our vulnerabilities have the power to make us stronger both individually and collectively. These pieces are just a small sample from my hundreds of journal entries.

Some of the greatest artists in history received little recognition while today you can have millions of followers on social media for all of the wrong reasons. The number of people that know you or know your work has little to no correlation with your personal value. Always remember that and make the work you need to make. The right people will pay attention and those are the lives you will change. It’s better to build one real connection than to have a million fake ones. Success and fame are an illusion. True success can only come from within. It is only by knowing yourself that others can truly begin to know you. 

Michael Carini | SHOP NOW

Michael Carini | SHOP NOW

Words from the artist journal

Etruscan tomb in Corsica may yield secrets on …

Etruscan tomb in Corsica may yield secrets on civilization’s decline

“French archaeologists have unearthed an Etruscan tomb containing a skeleton and dozens of artefacts in Corsica, a rare discovery that could shed new light on the wealthy civilization of northern Italy and its assimilation into the Roman Empire.

The archaeologists found the vault, chiselled into the rock and dating back to the fourth century B.C., within a large Roman necropolis containing thousands of tombs in Aleria, in the east of the French Mediterranean island.

The Etruscans originated in Tuscany during the Bronze Age in around 900 B.C. and left little written trace of their culture. Their decline was gradual and the last Etruscan cities were absorbed by Rome around 100 B.C.

The discovery, announced this week, could yield new details on the existence of a stable Etruscan population in Corsica and help archaeologists understand the slow demise of the Etruscan civilization.”

(by Paul Ortoli via Reuters)