Author: Dido of Carthage

theancientwayoflife:

~ Gold hair ornament.

Culture: Greek, from Acarnania

Date: 400 B.C.

theancientwayoflife:

~ Inlay Figure.

Place of origin: Egypt

Date: 299-1 B.C.

thesilicontribesman:

Roman Ropework, Vindolanda Roman Fort, Hadrian’s Wall, Northumberland.

thesilicontribesman:

Roman Brooch Fragment, Vindolanda Roman Fort, Hadrian’s Wall, Northumberland.

thesilicontribesman:

Roman Carved Griffin, Vindolanda Roman Fort, Hadrian’s Wall, Northumberland.

thesilicontribesman:

Wooden Comb with Roman Infantryman Metal Inlay, Vindolanda Roman Fort, Hadrian’s Wall, Northumberland.

thesilicontribesman:

Roman Jewellery Fragment, Vindolanda Roman Fort, Hadrian’s Wall, Northumberland.

coolancientstuff:

Drawing of a bilingual cylinder seal made from lapis lazuli. It bears the name of pharaoh Sehetepibre of the 13th Dynasty with a dedication to “Hathor, lady of Byblos” written in Egyptian hieroglyphs, and the name of the governor of Byblos Yakin-Ilu written in cuneiform. Unknown provenience, now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

barnsburntdownnow:

Jug (with birds)
Cypro-Archaic I, ca. 700-600 BCE, from Cyprus
Terracotta, Bichrome IV Ware

egypt-museum:

Wadjet Eye Pectoral of Tutankhamun

This pectoral was found on the mummy of the king Tutankhamun, symbol of the entity of the body. The cobra goddess Wadjet wearing the Red Crown of Lower Egypt “Deshret”, while the vulture goddess Nekhbet wearing the White Crown of the Upper Egypt “Hedjet”. Howard Carter believed that this pectoral was a piece of jewelry that the king would have worn while still living.

From the Tomb of Tutankhamun (KV62), Valley of the Kings, West Thebes. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. JE 61901