Art According to Facebook

5 days ago, we posted a photograph of the painting “The Hesperides Filling the Cornucopia” by the Dutch painter Conelis van Haarlem from 1622.

Unfortunately, that apparently was too much for Facebook and we ended up getting banned for 3 days.

Facebook’s own community standards, states:

We remove photographs of people displaying genitals or focusing in on fully exposed buttocks. We also restrict some images of female breasts if they include the nipple, but our intent is to allow images that are shared for medical or health purposes.

and then later:

We also allow photographs of paintings, sculptures, and other art that depicts nude figures.

In other words, Facebook claim that they allow photographs of paintings even if these paintings depics nude figures and yet, our post was removed, our account banned and it proved impossible to reach a sensible human being at Facebook (or rather – impossible to reach a human at all, sensible or not).

We get hundreds of idiotic click bait posts every single day, but we guess that is what Facebook feel is important.  In their minds, classical art is supposed to look like this:

This might seem a trivial or petty issue, but is it?  In the 16th century (a hundred years before the painting above), Pope Pius IX literally hacked of the penises of all the Greek statues in the Vatican.  Because of that act of insanity, these days the statues appear like this:

and a treasure was lost for eternity.

The fact that Facebook censor art even though they claim they do not represents the same level of vandalism.  It is a process of dumbing down people to the lowest denominator.  Facebook might claim to be doing the right thing, but in reality that is all bs and Facebook will prefer to feed it’s users an endless amount of – mostly paid – click bait.

Please share this post.  Perhaps if enough people share this, Facebook will wake up and realize that art should not be censored.

 

acrylicalchemy:

acrylicalchemy:

Michael Carini | Behind The Paint: Astranomelly | 78in x 120in

Michael Carini | LEARN MORE

Michael Carini | LEARN MORE

I painted “Forever Free Falling” at KAABOO Del Mar in 2017 during one of Tom Petty’s final performances. This is my tribute to the man, the legend, and now the angel. I’ll be back at KAABOO Del Mar this September with a few surprises up my sleeve.

If you enjoy my work or my stories, please share. You make what I do possible and I need your support now more than ever. Please check out CariniArts.com and if there’s something you want, I will find a solution for you. I’ve got art (of course), hoodies, shirts, swimsuits, leggings, sports bras, jewelry, and more. Check out this canvas HERE 🙂

Want to take my Painting & Vino San Diego classes? Check out my schedule HERE and please share with friends.

ahencyclopedia: AMASTRIS: AMASTRIS (c. 340/39-…

ahencyclopedia:

AMASTRIS:

AMASTRIS (c. 340/39-285 BCE) was a niece of the Persian king Darius III (r. 336-330 BCE) through her father Oxyathres. She was married in succession to Alexander’s general Craterus, the tyrant Dionysius of Heraclea, and finally to Lysimachus of Thrace. She founded an eponymous city in Paphlagonia and was the first queen to issue coins in her own name. 

Amastris was the mother of four children, was supposedly divorced so that Lysimachus could marry Arsinoe II, and was allegedly murdered by her sons for interfering in their affairs. Despite their divorce, Lysimachus still avenged her death by killing her sons. Scholars have mostly ignored Amastris and left the few known details of her life as contradictory as the ancient sources present them. Yet, the little-known queen is arguably the first true Hellenistic queen as she embodies the entanglement of Persian and Greco-Macedonian traditions.

As the daughter of prince Oxyathres, the brother of the last Persian king Darius III Codomannus, Amastris was in effect the last surviving Achaemenid princess. Although her mother is unknown, the only woman associated with her father is an Egyptian concubine called Timosa. After the Battle of Issus (333 BCE), Alexander the Great found Amastris among the other royal and noble women left by Darius at Damascus. During the grand wedding ceremony at Susa almost a decade later (324 BCE), when the Macedonian high commanders were married to Persian and Median women, Alexander gave Amastris to his general Craterus – the only companion besides Hephaestion to wed a Persian princess. Historians maintain that Craterus, famously devoted to Macedonian tradition, repudiated Amastris in order to marry Phila, the daughter of the Macedonian regent Antipater. As Macedonian royalty and nobility practiced polygamy, Craterus did not have to separate from one wife to marry another. Craterus, at any rate, would soon fall in battle (321 BCE).

Read More 

myfairylily: Hare and birds with geometric des…

myfairylily:

Hare and birds with geometric designs (detail) Roman Empire, Antioch, 400 AD. | archaeologyart

signorformica: Roman stray cat on one of th…

signorformica:

Roman stray cat on one of the two statues of Bes —Egyptian deity present in the Nile Valley since the Old Kingdom (ca.2686-2181 BC), later extended to Syria, Persia and Rome— that flank the strange, mysterious Alchemical Gate of Piazza Vittorio. Photo by Elliott Erwitt ~ 1959

Bibliothèque Infernale on FB

ahencyclopedia: AMASTRIS:AMASTRIS (c. 340/39-…

ahencyclopedia:

AMASTRIS:

AMASTRIS (c. 340/39-285 BCE) was a niece of the Persian king Darius III (r. 336-330 BCE) through her father Oxyathres. She was married in succession to Alexander’s general Craterus, the tyrant Dionysius of Heraclea, and finally to Lysimachus of Thrace. She founded an eponymous city in Paphlagonia and was the first queen to issue coins in her own name. 

Amastris was the mother of four children, was supposedly divorced so that Lysimachus could marry Arsinoe II, and was allegedly murdered by her sons for interfering in their affairs. Despite their divorce, Lysimachus still avenged her death by killing her sons. Scholars have mostly ignored Amastris and left the few known details of her life as contradictory as the ancient sources present them. Yet, the little-known queen is arguably the first true Hellenistic queen as she embodies the entanglement of Persian and Greco-Macedonian traditions.

As the daughter of prince Oxyathres, the brother of the last Persian king Darius III Codomannus, Amastris was in effect the last surviving Achaemenid princess. Although her mother is unknown, the only woman associated with her father is an Egyptian concubine called Timosa. After the Battle of Issus (333 BCE), Alexander the Great found Amastris among the other royal and noble women left by Darius at Damascus. During the grand wedding ceremony at Susa almost a decade later (324 BCE), when the Macedonian high commanders were married to Persian and Median women, Alexander gave Amastris to his general Craterus – the only companion besides Hephaestion to wed a Persian princess. Historians maintain that Craterus, famously devoted to Macedonian tradition, repudiated Amastris in order to marry Phila, the daughter of the Macedonian regent Antipater. As Macedonian royalty and nobility practiced polygamy, Craterus did not have to separate from one wife to marry another. Craterus, at any rate, would soon fall in battle (321 BCE).

Read More 

Carl Jutz – Entenfamilie an der Wehr, 1878

Carl Jutz – Entenfamilie an der Wehr, 1878

acrylicalchemy:

acrylicalchemy:

Michael Carini | Behind The Paint 

didoofcarthage: Venus and the Three Graces Pre…

didoofcarthage:

Venus and the Three Graces Presenting Gifts to a Young Woman by Sandro Botticelli

c. 1484

fresco on canvas

The Louvre

Thank you so much for your ongoing support!. k…

Thank you so much for your ongoing support!. ko-fi.com/themedievalmagazine:

arthistorycq:

I want to thank everyone who has donated, sent encouraging messages & shared our cause. Thank you thank you thank you! Every single penny helps us so much. More than you know. It’s so hard to do something in the humanities and actually making a decent living from it. We want to keep the magazine alive and keep delivering the best and most beautiful source for medieval history.

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