Art According to Facebook

5 days ago, we posted a photograph of the painting “The Hesperides Filling the Cornucopia” by the Dutch painter Conelis van Haarlem from 1622.

Unfortunately, that apparently was too much for Facebook and we ended up getting banned for 3 days.

Facebook’s own community standards, states:

We remove photographs of people displaying genitals or focusing in on fully exposed buttocks. We also restrict some images of female breasts if they include the nipple, but our intent is to allow images that are shared for medical or health purposes.

and then later:

We also allow photographs of paintings, sculptures, and other art that depicts nude figures.

In other words, Facebook claim that they allow photographs of paintings even if these paintings depics nude figures and yet, our post was removed, our account banned and it proved impossible to reach a sensible human being at Facebook (or rather – impossible to reach a human at all, sensible or not).

We get hundreds of idiotic click bait posts every single day, but we guess that is what Facebook feel is important.  In their minds, classical art is supposed to look like this:

This might seem a trivial or petty issue, but is it?  In the 16th century (a hundred years before the painting above), Pope Pius IX literally hacked of the penises of all the Greek statues in the Vatican.  Because of that act of insanity, these days the statues appear like this:

and a treasure was lost for eternity.

The fact that Facebook censor art even though they claim they do not represents the same level of vandalism.  It is a process of dumbing down people to the lowest denominator.  Facebook might claim to be doing the right thing, but in reality that is all bs and Facebook will prefer to feed it’s users an endless amount of – mostly paid – click bait.

Please share this post.  Perhaps if enough people share this, Facebook will wake up and realize that art should not be censored.

 

acrylicalchemy: As every story has a past, pr…

acrylicalchemy:

As every story has a past, present, and future, what may at first glimpse appear to be non-objective abstraction is in fact energetic imagery interacting and breathing through the boundlessness of space and time 🌹

Featured: Astranomelly. Acrylic on canvas. 78in x 120in. “Astranomelly” was the culminating piece of my artist residency in Downtown San Diego. During the months of April/May (2012) I spent 50 days painting on Broadway Avenue, generally averaging 10-12 hours per session and never taking a single day off. Basically living in the studio as I found myself on the precipice of homelessness, this climactic creation measures 6.5′ x 10′ and is representative of my collective experiences as “The Boy In The Box.” The culture shock of the residency experience made this both an artistic opportunity and a sociological experiment as I found myself imbued with the regionalism of this foreign community and was indoctrinated into their culture. The individuals that visited and shared their stories during my tenure in the box were all incorporated into the painting, their names inscribed in the underpainting that surrounds the iconic vortex (or black hole) that is simultaneously a symbol of the outward eyes looking in at me as I poured my soul into the canvas. The concept for “Astranomelly” came to me on a car ride home at 3:30am as I listened to the track “Battling the Sun” by local musician Astra Kelly. I had met Astra earlier that evening when she stopped in during a rare San Diego storm. The rest of the story I now leave with you.

Shop for brand new affordable prints and products at CariniArts.com or DM for originals and custom prints. Please follow, share, and tag for a chance to win free art in giveaways. Your support makes what I do possible. Thank you ❤️

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Michael Carini | SHOP NOW

Michael Carini | SHOP NOW

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Spring by Olga Wisinger-Florian – 1908

Spring by Olga Wisinger-Florian – 1908

acrylicalchemy: Michael Carini | Learn More Af…

acrylicalchemy:

Michael Carini | Learn More

Affordable canvas options for your home and office. Various sizes and available as a single panel or triptych.

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Rozenn Le Gall 

Rozenn Le Gall 

rozennlegallcollages.com

acrylicalchemy: Michael Carini | Learn More I …

acrylicalchemy:

Michael Carini | Learn More

I Gave You Every Piece Of Me But You Could Never Love A Puzzle (95,126,814,720 Pieces Of An Alchemist). With Valentine’s Day coming I’m focusing on some of my love themed paintings. My bright paintings are often my darkest. This painting reflects upon battles with both self-love and the realization I often give the love I always wish I had. It’s often difficult for people to love a puzzle they can’t put together. The box can be intriguing, maybe they even open it, but so few are willing to take the time to see it through to the final piece. The number of puzzle pieces is also a direct reference to my mega creation Regenaissance. Perhaps the reason the puzzle is so difficult to complete is that so many pieces are missing because they were given away to people that mishandled them and never put them back in the box.

Light & Dark – Rebecca Louise Law 

Light & Dark – Rebecca Louise Law 

rebeccalouiselaw.com

Władysław Teodor “W.T.” Benda

Władysław Teodor “W.T.” Benda

an-overwhelming-question: George Platt Lynes …

an-overwhelming-question:

George Platt Lynes – Narcissus, 1939