Art According to Facebook

5 days ago, we posted a photograph of the painting “The Hesperides Filling the Cornucopia” by the Dutch painter Conelis van Haarlem from 1622.

Unfortunately, that apparently was too much for Facebook and we ended up getting banned for 3 days.

Facebook’s own community standards, states:

We remove photographs of people displaying genitals or focusing in on fully exposed buttocks. We also restrict some images of female breasts if they include the nipple, but our intent is to allow images that are shared for medical or health purposes.

and then later:

We also allow photographs of paintings, sculptures, and other art that depicts nude figures.

In other words, Facebook claim that they allow photographs of paintings even if these paintings depics nude figures and yet, our post was removed, our account banned and it proved impossible to reach a sensible human being at Facebook (or rather – impossible to reach a human at all, sensible or not).

We get hundreds of idiotic click bait posts every single day, but we guess that is what Facebook feel is important.  In their minds, classical art is supposed to look like this:

This might seem a trivial or petty issue, but is it?  In the 16th century (a hundred years before the painting above), Pope Pius IX literally hacked of the penises of all the Greek statues in the Vatican.  Because of that act of insanity, these days the statues appear like this:

and a treasure was lost for eternity.

The fact that Facebook censor art even though they claim they do not represents the same level of vandalism.  It is a process of dumbing down people to the lowest denominator.  Facebook might claim to be doing the right thing, but in reality that is all bs and Facebook will prefer to feed it’s users an endless amount of – mostly paid – click bait.

Please share this post.  Perhaps if enough people share this, Facebook will wake up and realize that art should not be censored.

 

acrylicalchemy: New “Flears” bracelet availabl…

acrylicalchemy:

New “Flears” bracelet available! 12 new bracelet designs now available plus also available in canvas, necklace, jewelry box, shirt, and women’s casual shoes HERE!

Featured: Just Floating On The Tears (Flears). Acrylic on canvas. 36in x 36in. This painting depicts an angelic baby figure resting or floating on top of a tear drop. It represents a deep and innocent state of blues that holds a unique beauty. Sometime the blue moments of our life are the most beautiful if we can just manage to get past them. For me, this would be the loss of my father at such a young age.

Shop for brand new affordable prints and products at Carini Arts (20% OFF with Promo Code: THANKYOU until 11/25) or Society6 + DM for originals and custom inquiries. Please follow, share, and tag 3 friends for a chance to win free art in monthly giveaways. Your support makes what I do possible. Thank you!

See larger portfolio at MichaelCarini.com

#AcrylicAlchemy #MichaelCarini #CariniArts

For use of colours i am fascinated by Felix Va…

For use of colours i am fascinated by Felix Valotton’s work. I always wondered why he wasnt more well known!

Oh I love these! Each of his paintings are so different. 

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‘La Blanche et la Noire,’ 1913

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‘Waltz,’ 1893

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‘Verdun,’ 1917

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‘Marigolds and Tangerines,’ 1924

Regular

acrosscenturiesandgenerations:

▪Head of a young woman, among flowering stems.

Period: Mughal dynasty

Date: ca. 1620

Movement/School: Mughal Court/Mughal School

Medium: Color and gold on paper

Do you think applying paint on a canvas has a …

Do you think applying paint on a canvas has a future? We're historically invested in it, but computer based techniques (3d rendering, digital painting) are taking off. And pictures on screens have all sorts of wonderful qualities that are difficult to get in paint.

The argument for traditional art can be made with the same point as that last sentence. There is many qualities with traditional art that are unique to itself. The appeal of traditional art is in many areas. You could argue that digital art is the same, but each have their virtues and limitations. Some people want to know they have artwork that couldn’t be easily reproduced, and the process behind it. Hell, some people even love the smell of paints and mediums, so it’s different for everyone. Seeing a painting in person, is always so much different than seeing a photograph or print of that painting. It’s so much more rich and emotional. I think while that feeling still exists, the desire to paint on canvas will too.

When photography was invented, humans didn’t stop painting. In fact, art was pushed to evolve even more. Artists will never stop creating, and I don’t think the mastery of putting paint on canvas will ever die. If it became rarer, it would most likely just spark another interest to find that lost art.

Both digital and traditional inspire audiences. Art is to inspire, digital tools and traditional tools are still just tools. I don’t think paint on a canvas will ever die out.

acrylicalchemy: Michael Carini | Just Floating…

acrylicalchemy:

Michael Carini | Just Floating On The Tears

As every story has a past, present, and future, what may at first glimpse appear to be non-objective abstraction is in fact energetic imagery interacting and breathing through the boundlessness of space and time.

Featured: Just Floating On The Tears (Flears). Acrylic on canvas. 36in x 36in. This painting depicts an angelic baby figure resting or floating on top of a tear drop. It represents a deep and innocent state of blues that holds a unique beauty. Sometime the blue moments of our life are the most beautiful if we can just manage to get past them. For me, this would be the loss of my father at such a young age. 

Shop for brand new affordable prints and products at Carini Arts (20% OFF with Promo Code: THANKYOU until 11/25) or Society6 + DM for originals and custom inquiries. Please follow, share, and tag for a chance to win free art in monthly giveaways. Your support makes what I do possible. Thank you!

See more at MichaelCarini.com

#AcrylicAlchemy #MichaelCarini

medievalpoc: Peter Paul Rubens Four Studies of…

medievalpoc:

Peter Paul Rubens

Four Studies of a Male Head

Netherlands (c. 1617-19)

Oil on canvas transferred from wood, 51 x 66 cm.

Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts, Brussels.

These are by far the best photographs I have seen on this work, and we all owe a debt to the photographer. Four Studies is one of Ruben’s most popular pieces, despite the fact that it’s not one of his monumental works (some of which I have had the delight of seeing in person, and they are distinctively massive).

Studies like this one were usually meant to serve as reference in the creation those larger compositions, which would usually depict scenes from the Christian bible, Greek or roman mythology, or historical scenes of battles, monarchs, or other notable events.

Photo

Photo

artist-basquiat: Untitled, Jean-Michel Basqui…

artist-basquiat:

Untitled, Jean-Michel Basquiat

https://www.wikiart.org/en/jean-michel-basquiat/untitled-0

wonderwarhol:

wonderwarhol:

Joan of Arc Listening to Her Voices, 1845, by François Rude (1784-1855)

For you, which painters work best with color?

For you, which painters work best with color?

This is very subjective, but the artists below all appeal to me because of their striking use of colour, or complex colour palette. There would be so many missing from this list, especially a lot of 19th century artists, but I think you get the idea! 

For me, Contemporary wise, I like a lot of contrast. The contrast between colours used, like Emilio Villalba’s ‘I Don’t See’ series. I either like really dark images with splashes of colour, or admire how the artist has put together certain colours. 

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But I also love the altering of colours, like Glen Brown.

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Contemporary artists that focus on the use of colour rather than contrast or elements of realism, I love Inka Essenhigh’s use of colour to create more rhythm in her work.

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For older works, it is sooo tough. There’s French artist Louis Anquetin, who really knew how to create an atmosphere with colour. Another obvious artist would be Van Gogh’s use of colour as well! And Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, who would really pick a colour and create an atmosphere with it. Because these artists were inspired by a more “block” kind of colouring and less shading, the colour choices really matter!

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J. M. W. Turner’s use of colour was exceptional, as he managed to convey certain scenes (like sea scapes) and some are almost non-representation, but just a certain smidgen of colour reveals them. Such as ‘Snow Storm: Steam-Boat off a Harbour’s Mouth,’ painted in 1842:

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There’s the obvious choice of Claude Monet and his contemporaries.

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For more dark and natural colour palettes that I really admire, Rembrandt would certainly be high on the list. His colour mixing was known to be highly complex, as he built them up.

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Eugène Delacroix, for the same reason.

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Oh! And I almost forgot about the Pre-Raphaelites. Their use of colour was exquisite, especially since they appreciated creating more ornate and elaborate artworks, so the selection of colour had to be carefully chosen.

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